Q update your applications domain classes to use collections where it’s appropriate. The item object MUST support all of these use cases. The application MUST use a collection. e.g., where you have one-to-many relationships Create unit tests for the new functionality These are the use cases that the application will support Title: Create a main list Description: A user will be able to create a parent list within the application Title: Create list items Description: The user will be able to create items under a parent list Title: Check off items Description: A user will be able to check of to do list items that have been completed Title: Edit a list item Description: A user will be able to edit an existing list item Title: Delete a list item Description: A user will be able to remove / delete a list item Title: Email list Description: A user will be able to email a to do list to a user via email

In order to update the applications domain classes to use collections where it’s appropriate, we will need to modify the item object to support the specified use cases. The application also needs to use a collection to implement the one-to-many relationships.

To begin with, let’s consider the use case of creating a main list. This use case involves creating a parent list within the application. In order to support this, we can introduce a new class called MainList that would contain a collection of ListItems. This collection will allow us to store multiple list items under the parent list.

Next, let’s look at the use case of creating list items. This use case involves creating items under a parent list. We can accomplish this by adding a method in the MainList class called “addItem” that takes a ListItem object as an argument. This method will allow us to add the new list item to the collection of items in the parent list.

Moving on to the use case of checking off items, we can add a boolean attribute called “completed” in the ListItem class. This attribute will indicate whether a particular task has been completed or not. By updating this attribute, the user will be able to check off to-do list items that have been completed.

For the use case of editing a list item, we can add methods in the ListItem class that allow us to modify the attributes of the item, such as the title or description. These methods will enable the user to edit an existing list item.

Similarly, for the use case of deleting a list item, we can introduce a method in the MainList class called “removeItem” that takes a ListItem object as an argument. This method will allow us to remove or delete the specified list item from the collection.

Lastly, for the use case of emailing a to-do list, we may need to involve other classes or libraries that handle email functionality. We can create a method in the MainList class called “emailList” that would take the necessary parameters to send the list via email.

Once we have updated the domain classes to support these use cases and implemented the necessary methods, we can proceed to create unit tests to verify the new functionality. Unit tests will help ensure that the domain classes and methods are functioning correctly and meeting the requirements of the use cases.

In conclusion, by incorporating collections into the domain classes and implementing the necessary methods, we can modify the item object to support the given use cases. Creating unit tests will help confirm the correct implementation of the new functionality.

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