#include #include struct node { int data; struct node *next; }; int main() { struct node *first, *p, *first2, *p2; int value; first = 0; scanf (“%d”, &value); while (value != -9999){ p = first; first = (struct node *) malloc (sizeof(struct node)); first -> data = value; first -> next = p; scanf(“%d”, &value); } for (p = first; p != 0; p = p -> next){ printf(“%d “, p -> data); } first2 = 0; p2 = 0; for (p = first; p != 0; p = p -> next){ p2 = first2; first2 = (struct node *) malloc (sizeof(struct node)); first2 -> data = p -> data; first2 -> next = p2; } for (p2 = first2; p2 != 0; p2 = p2 -> next){ printf(“%d “, p2 -> data); } printf(“n”); return 0; } Declare first2 and p2 to be local variables along with the other locals as follows: struct node *first, *p, *first2, *p; int value;

The provided code is in C and it involves linked lists. The code creates a linked list by taking input values from the user and then printing the values of the linked list.

The code starts by declaring the struct node, which represents a node in a linked list. Each node contains an integer data element and a pointer to the next node.

Inside the main() function, the first and p variables are declared as pointers to struct node. The value variable is declared to store the input values from the user.

The first variable is set to 0 initially, which indicates an empty linked list.

The code uses scanf to read an integer value from the user and stores it in the value variable. The while loop is used to repeat this process until the user enters -9999. Inside the loop, a new node is created with malloc and its data is set to the value variable. The newly created node becomes the first node of the linked list, and its next pointer is set to the old first node (which is stored in the p variable). Finally, the scanf function is used again to read the next input value.

After the while loop, a for loop is used to print the values of the linked list. The loop starts from the first node and iterates until it reaches the end of the list (when p becomes 0). In each iteration, the data element of the current node is printed using printf.

Next, the code initializes the first2 and p2 variables to 0. These variables will be used to create a new linked list that is a copy of the original linked list.

Another for loop is used to iterate through the original linked list. Inside the loop, a new node is created with malloc, and its data is set to the data of the corresponding node in the original list. The new node becomes the first node of the new linked list, and its next pointer is set to the old first node (which is stored in the p2 variable).

Finally, another for loop is used to print the values of the new linked list.

The code prints a newline character (n) before the program exits.

To address the issue raised in the last line of the provided code, you should change the variable name from p2 to another name, such as p_new, to avoid reusing the same variable name. Here’s the corrected code segment:

“`c
first2 = 0;
struct node* p_new = 0;
for (p = first; p != 0; p = p->next)
{
p_new = first2;
first2 = (struct node *)malloc(sizeof(struct node));
first2->data = p->data;
first2->next = p_new;
}
“`

This change will prevent any potential error caused by using the same variable name for different purposes.

Need your ASSIGNMENT done? Use our paper writing service to score better and meet your deadline.


Click Here to Make an Order Click Here to Hire a Writer