1. List OrderIDs and the associated Employee Names for orders that shipped after the required date. (Hint: Employees to Orders is a one-to-many relationship. So JOIN the two table Employees and Orders and have the WHERE clause filter orders with ShippedDate > RequiredDate) 2. List Products (ProductID, ProductName) and their Suppliers (SupplierID, CompanyName) (Hint: Suppliers and Products have one-to-many relationship, so JOIN the two table Suppliers and Products) 3. List all Customers (CustomerID, CompanyName) and their Orders (OrderID, OrderedDate) (Hint: Customers and Orders have one-to-many relationship, and since all Customers is mentioned which means you need to do a LEFT OUTER JOIN) 4. List Customers (CustomerID, CompanyName) and Orders (OrderID, OrderedDate) including the ones they have not placed (Hint: Customers and Orders have one-to-many relatinship, and since all Orders is mentioned which means you need to do a RIGHT OUTER JOIN) 5. List all Categories (CategoryID, CategoryName) and all Products (ProductID, ProductName) (Hint: Categories and Products have one-to-many relationship, and since all Categories and all Products is mentioned do a FULL OUTER JOIN)

1. To list OrderIDs and the associated Employee Names for orders that shipped after the required date, we need to join the Employees and Orders tables. The relationship between Employees and Orders is one-to-many, meaning that one employee can be associated with multiple orders. We can achieve this by using a JOIN statement and filtering the results using a WHERE clause.

The SQL query for this task would look like:

SELECT Orders.OrderID, Employees.EmployeeName
FROM Orders
JOIN Employees ON Orders.EmployeeID = Employees.EmployeeID
WHERE Orders.ShippedDate > Orders.RequiredDate;

This query will select the OrderID and EmployeeName from the Orders and Employees tables, joining them based on the EmployeeID. The WHERE clause is used to filter the orders where the ShippedDate is greater than the RequiredDate.

2. To list the Products (ProductID, ProductName) and their Suppliers (SupplierID, CompanyName), we need to use a JOIN statement to combine the Products and Suppliers tables. The relationship between Products and Suppliers is one-to-many, meaning that one supplier can supply multiple products.

The SQL query for this task would look like:

SELECT Products.ProductID, Products.ProductName, Suppliers.SupplierID, Suppliers.CompanyName
FROM Products
JOIN Suppliers ON Products.SupplierID = Suppliers.SupplierID;

This query will select the ProductID, ProductName, SupplierID, and CompanyName from the Products and Suppliers tables, joining them based on the SupplierID.

3. To list all Customers (CustomerID, CompanyName) and their Orders (OrderID, OrderedDate), we need to use a LEFT OUTER JOIN since all customers are mentioned. This means that even if a customer doesn’t have any orders, they should still be included in the result.

The SQL query for this task would look like:

SELECT Customers.CustomerID, Customers.CompanyName, Orders.OrderID, Orders.OrderedDate
FROM Customers
LEFT JOIN Orders ON Customers.CustomerID = Orders.CustomerID;

This query will select the CustomerID, CompanyName, OrderID, and OrderedDate from the Customers and Orders tables, joining them based on the CustomerID. The LEFT JOIN ensures that all customers, regardless of whether they have any orders or not, are included in the result.

4. To list Customers (CustomerID, CompanyName) and Orders (OrderID, OrderedDate) including the ones they have not placed, we need to use a RIGHT OUTER JOIN. This is because all orders are mentioned, meaning even if an order does not have a corresponding customer, it should still be included in the result.

The SQL query for this task would look like:

SELECT Customers.CustomerID, Customers.CompanyName, Orders.OrderID, Orders.OrderedDate
FROM Customers
RIGHT JOIN Orders ON Customers.CustomerID = Orders.CustomerID;

This query will select the CustomerID, CompanyName, OrderID, and OrderedDate from the Customers and Orders tables, joining them based on the CustomerID. The RIGHT JOIN ensures that all orders, regardless of whether they have a corresponding customer or not, are included in the result.

5. To list all Categories (CategoryID, CategoryName) and all Products (ProductID, ProductName), we need to use a FULL OUTER JOIN. This will give us a result that includes all categories and all products, regardless of whether they have a relationship.

The SQL query for this task would look like:

SELECT Categories.CategoryID, Categories.CategoryName, Products.ProductID, Products.ProductName
FROM Categories
FULL OUTER JOIN Products ON Categories.CategoryID = Products.CategoryID;

This query will select the CategoryID, CategoryName, ProductID, and ProductName from the Categories and Products tables, joining them based on the CategoryID. The FULL OUTER JOIN ensures that all categories and all products, regardless of their relationship, are included in the result.

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